Easy Nose Wire Hack

Who knew? Old lady hair pins with coated tips are ideal for adding a removable nose wire to fabric masks for the exact same reason the idea was rejected. They’re too thin to sew in… you can wiggle it out between the threads of your stitching.

Yes, just wiggle it in between the threads of the edge seam ye a couple inches down from the center of the top, slide it on up where you want it, and bend it as desired. What’s cool is those wiggles on the pin landed ye about where I usually bend and the top stitching works like a little casing to hold it in there until you are ready to wiggle it back out without breaking a thread.

I only tried the “thin” pins… there are usually two bundles of pins per package, with one bundle of pins being thinner than the other. You can find them in most any store that sells hair products. A pack of 100 only costs about a dollar.

This will work great on the lightweight reversible “Casual” and “Summer Masks” that I sewed without nose wires, mainly because both styles are shaped so a nose wire really isn’t needed but, some people still want a nose wire.

The denim/batik mask shown in photos is one I made for myself. Here’s the main photo again because I’m going to share this to my Facebook page and it always shows the last photo… yeah, gotta wiggle around all this tech stuff. Thanks for reading!

EDIT/UPDATE 8/19/2020: blew off paragraphs about opening an online store as turned that into an art store… seems anyone wanting a mask just contacts me directly, so no sense posting masks there. If you want to see what is currently available, visit my masks4sale page here on this blog. Thank you!

Fabulous Batiks (and real pipe cleaners)

I have to show & tell, even though they’re gone… maybe I should show the next batch here before posting on Facebook? Anyways, I had the pleasure of sewing masks from batik fabrics that a friend ordered from Amazon in a stack of fat eighths. Here are a few that were photographed before finishing with strap or ear loops.

The last photo shows how I improved my pattern to create a better casing to slide in elastic ear loops or a shoestring strap (not sewn in, so can switch up later, replace the elastic or whatever). All have a non-woven layer inside (featherweight Pellon) and a pipe cleaner nose wire. A real one… not the cheap kind that melt when ironed.

Hey, it has to feel good, too.

Here’s what I use… shown on top of Autumn Leaves fabric (with unbleached muslin lining) cut to make a pleated flat with a hidden pocket for my sister Jai up in Michigan.

If you want to see what Autumn Leaves looks like finished (or other masks available for purchase), here’s a link to the masks4sale page. Thanks for reading!

NOTE: the “Summer Batiks” currently available are NOT made exactly the same… they’re only 2 layers of fabric, reversible, with soft, sewn-in ear loops and optional (retrofitted) hairpin nose wires. (All of the 3-layer, non-reversible batik masks shown here are gone.)

Buggies

Couldn’t help but smile while sewing a stack of fun buggies… they will be finished to order with the buyer’s choice of ear loops or a shoestring strap.

Yes, I altered the sewing method by not sewing the sides, then added casings after turning and stitching the pleats. Not only is my machine much happier (less layers to try to stitch through), but those casings makes it so ear loops can be replaced, if need be. I love the “new” elastic, too! It looks nicer and feels better, plus ties nicely into square knots that can hidden inside the casing instead of sewn-in, so those knots can be re-tied for a custom fit.

Now that I actually LIKE making pleated masks, I shall sew more… maybe next time, I’ll add pockets. Do people actually use them, or do they just like the idea of having a pocket?

NOTE: fabric was cut into 7 x 9 inch rectangles (or 5 x 7 for child size) and finished ye a half inch wider with the casings. The nose wire is a 6 inch plush cotton pipe cleaner (a real one, not the decorative kind for kiddie crafts) so it will not melt if you iron over it. More photos of the Buggies are on the masks4sale page, if you want to see what each looks like with the pleats opened. Hopefully, they will have you smiling, too!

Thanks for reading and happy sewing!